Home > Uncategorized > A Lunch Slice of PISA

A Lunch Slice of PISA

December 4, 2013

As I mentioned yesterday, the United States performance on the Program for International Student Assessment is based on a mere 6,111 students who tested. Of the 64 countries included in the study, only Indonesia tested a lower percentage of students.

Country

# 15 year olds

# tested

% tested

Qatar

11,667

10,966

93.99%

Luxembourg

6,187

5,260

85.02%

Macao-China

6,600

5,335

80.83%

Iceland

4,505

3,508

77.87%

Liechtenstein

417

293

70.26%

Montenegro, Republic of

8,600

4,744

55.16%

Cyprus

9,956

5,078

51.00%

Estonia

12,649

5,867

46.38%

Slovenia

19,471

7,229

37.13%

Latvia

18,789

5,276

28.08%

United Arab Emirates

48,824

11,500

23.55%

Finland

62,523

8,829

14.12%

Switzerland

87,200

11,234

12.88%

Croatia

48,155

6,153

12.78%

Lithuania

38,524

4,618

11.99%

Denmark

72,310

7,481

10.35%

Singapore

53,637

5,546

10.34%

Uruguay

54,638

5,315

9.73%

Slovak Republic

59,723

5,737

9.61%

New Zealand

60,940

5,248

8.61%

Ireland

59,296

5,016

8.46%

Belgium

123,469

9,690

7.85%

Bulgaria

70,188

5,282

7.53%

Norway

64,917

4,686

7.22%

Czech Republic

96,946

6,535

6.74%

Italy

605,490

38,142

6.30%

Albania

76,910

4,743

6.17%

Australia

291,967

17,774

6.09%

Spain

423,444

25,335

5.98%

Shanghai-China

108,056

6,374

5.90%

Serbia, Republic of

80,089

4,684

5.85%

Costa Rica

81,489

4,602

5.65%

Hong Kong-China

84,200

4,670

5.55%

Jordan

129,492

7,038

5.44%

Portugal

108,728

5,722

5.26%

Canada

417,873

21,548

5.16%

Israel

118,953

6,061

5.10%

Austria

93,537

4,756

5.08%

Sweden

102,087

4,739

4.64%

Greece

110,521

5,125

4.64%

Hungary

111,761

4,810

4.30%

Romania

146,243

5,074

3.47%

Tunisia

132,313

4,407

3.33%

Chile

274,803

6,857

2.50%

Netherlands

194,000

4,460

2.30%

Kazakhstan

258,716

5,808

2.24%

Chinese Taipei

328,356

6,046

1.84%

United Kingdom

738,066

12,659

1.72%

Mexico

2,114,745

33,806

1.60%

Poland

425,597

5,662

1.33%

Colombia

889,729

11,173

1.26%

Peru

584,294

6,035

1.03%

Malaysia

544,302

5,197

0.95%

Argentina

684,879

5,908

0.86%

Korea, Republic of

687,104

5,033

0.73%

France

792,983

5,682

0.72%

Thailand

982,080

6,606

0.67%

Germany

798,136

5,001

0.63%

Brazil

3,574,928

20,091

0.56%

Japan

1,241,786

6,351

0.51%

Russian Federation

1,272,632

6,418

0.50%

Turkey

1,266,638

4,848

0.38%

Vietnam

1,717,996

4,959

0.29%

United States

3,985,714

6,111

0.15%

Indonesia

4,174,217

5,622

0.13%

Totals

31,854,985

512,363

1.61

I noticed that every country with more than a million students in the age group tested a smaller than average percentage of their students. I’m not sure what percentage should be tested to ensure that the sample is representative of the country either. I just know this seems really, really small. While I don’t place much stock in PISA scores or the diatribes they generate, here’s some additional information in case you are interested (because it’s ok to be a skeptic, but better to be a well-informed skeptic):

Advertisements
Categories: Uncategorized Tags: ,
  1. December 4, 2013 at 4:55 pm

    This is puzzling to me as well. I understand statistical sampling, but it would seem like the proportions would be similar from one nation to another. Using the ratio, we could conduct our state testing program with a few dozen kiddos. Think they would let my school randomly test 0.15% of our students on the reading test. That would be 2.4 kids…we could round up to three! I could test them in my office in one morning!

    I better get busy and get a slice of this PISA! You’re on top of it! Good work.

    Like

    • December 4, 2013 at 7:45 pm

      I could make PISA puns all day. Unfortunately, there’s just not enough material to go with it.

      I got a lesson on how the samples are chosen following a comment I made on Diane Ravitch’s blog. I just can’t get past thinking that this is not substantial.

      Like

  1. No trackbacks yet.
Comments are closed.
%d bloggers like this: