Home > Uncategorized > Remember the Names (part 2)

Remember the Names (part 2)

November 16, 2017

One thing educators just love hearing is that our schools should be run more like businesses. It’s a great politician line: If schools were run more like businesses…
…we’d be able to pay all the teachers $100,000 a year. Of course, there’d only be about five teachers for every 500 students, but still…

I hate the mindset of treating either the students or the content we teach as a commodity. Our district finance offices should be run more like businesses. We have millions of dollars come in and go out every year – mostly into payroll. We want to save money and run as efficiently as possible, but not at the expense of educating children.

I do wonder, however, about one thing that would be different if we operated more like the business world. Maybe we’d be able to wine and dine our legislators and get our way. We’d be able to post record profits and still complain to lawmakers that they’re trying to bankrupt us. As it is, we can show up with a crowd of 25,000 people who support public education and have no impact.

Sky Shot

All together now!

Oil and Gas producers can show up with a few charter buses and campaign-quality signs and kill legislation. I definitely wish in that sense, that we were more like big business. Clout has its privileges.

On the other hand, nobody ever tells schools, you should operate more like the legislature. Imagine what that would look like.

I’m going to leave the Senate alone for now. They seem to be functioning on a higher level than the House during this quite Extraordinary Legislative Session.

But that House…bless them. Bless them all.

Each of the past two Wednesdays, the House has voted on a bill to finish the job of implementing a budget that should have been finalized in May. Last week, they killed HB 1054, which would have raised taxes on cigarettes, gasoline, watered-down beer, and gross production. It would have raised salaries for teachers and state employees. It had the 75% of votes needed in the Senate, but it died in the House by a vote of 71-27.

This week, however, the House approved a budget that uses some one-time money to limit cuts. This plan, HB 1019, passed with a vote of 65-25. Critical agencies will still face cuts. Higher education loses over $17 million. Health care loses $15 million, DHS $4 million, and Mental Health another $4 million.

Simply put, this budget will cost people more than their livelihoods. It will cost some their lives.

HB 1054 wasn’t perfect. It had elements that everybody found distasteful. It’s what was needed, though. Since we live in a state in which 65 passes but 71 fails, this is what we get.

If you want to read more about yesterday’s discussion in the House, check out Claudia Swisher’s blog. All I’m going to do is give you a list showing how House members voted on each bill (and a brief thought about each group). You can determine for yourself how to characterize these representatives.

You can call it a Special Session Scorecard, or maybe a twisted version of the Meyers-Briggs personality test. Perhaps it’s a Rorschach test for who funds the campaigns of each group.

Yes on both

Babinec, Baker, Caldwell, Casey, Cockroft, Echols, Fetgatter, Ford, Frix, Hall, Hilbert, Jordan, Kannady, Kerbs, Lawson, Lepak, Martinez, McCall, McDaniel, McDugle, McEntire, Montgomery, Mulready, Murdock, Newton, Ortega, Osborn, Osburn, Ownbey, Park, Pfeiffer, D. Roberts, Russ, Sanders, Sears, Taylor, Vaughan, Wallace, Watson, J. West, T. West, Wright

Total: 42 Republicans, 0 Democrats

To me, this group of people looked at HB 1054 as a massive compromise and the best we could do given the circumstances. This week, maybe they felt less hopeful and just had to vote for something to get finished. I would guess a lot of the names above have lost confidence in many of their colleagues.

No on both

Kouplen, Proctor, Stone, Williams, Murphey

Total: 1 Republican, 4 Democrats

If you’re neither looking for solutions nor draconian cuts,  I honestly don’t know how to read you.

Yes on 1054, no on 1019

F. Bennett, Blancett, Cannaday, Condit, Dollens, Dunnington, Fourkiller, Gaddis, Griffith, Hoskin, Loring, Meredith, Munson, Perryman, Renegar, Rosecrants, Tadlock, Virgin, Walke, Young, Humphrey, Thomsen

Total: 2 Republicans, 20 Democrats

Everybody who voted yes on HB 1054 sacrificed ideological purity to do so. This group didn’t feel like unclicking that button, I suppose.

No on 1054, yes on 1019

Calvey, Cleveland, Coody, Derby, Downing, Dunlap, Enns, Faught, Gann, Hardin, McBride, McEachin, Moore, O’Donnell, Ritze, S. Roberts, Strohm, Teague, K. West, R. West

Total: 20 Republicans, 0 Democrats

Well, people may die, but at least everybody’s third-quarter profits are safe.

Others

J. Bennett – missed vote on HB 1054, Yes on HB 1019
Inman, Rogers – No on HB 1054, missed vote on HB 1019
Goodwin, Lowe, Nichols, Bush, Henke, Nollan, Worthen – Yes on HB 1054, missed vote on HB 1019

***Important Note*** I’ve checked and double-checked these votes. If you find any inaccuracies, please let me know.
Vote on HB 1054
Vote on HB 1019

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  1. Roger Hill
    November 16, 2017 at 5:37 pm

    It’s time for line item appropriations for budgeting and audits for all state agencies. Taxpayers want and expect efficient government including public schools.

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  2. Barbara Smith
    November 17, 2017 at 9:34 am

    I will say again that Oklahoma has the best elected officials that money can buy! Their “Christian” values are expressed in their disregard for children, their willingness to let people die, and their belief that they need to fight terrorist organizations like their constituents who work for state agencies! This is merely a reflection of what is going on at the national level. Oligarchy here we come!

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  3. Katherine Leidy
    November 18, 2017 at 9:44 am

    Please add a first initial to the 2 Bennetts in the House. I’m sure Forrest Bennett (D) does not wish to be mistaken for John Bennett (R).

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    • November 18, 2017 at 9:50 am

      Thanks for noticing that. I typed the post in Word, and when I moved it to WordPress, apparently the initials converted to a numerical list, starting with 1. Weird.

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