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Posts Tagged ‘PISA’

A Lunch Slice of PISA

December 4, 2013 2 comments

As I mentioned yesterday, the United States performance on the Program for International Student Assessment is based on a mere 6,111 students who tested. Of the 64 countries included in the study, only Indonesia tested a lower percentage of students.

Country

# 15 year olds

# tested

% tested

Qatar

11,667

10,966

93.99%

Luxembourg

6,187

5,260

85.02%

Macao-China

6,600

5,335

80.83%

Iceland

4,505

3,508

77.87%

Liechtenstein

417

293

70.26%

Montenegro, Republic of

8,600

4,744

55.16%

Cyprus

9,956

5,078

51.00%

Estonia

12,649

5,867

46.38%

Slovenia

19,471

7,229

37.13%

Latvia

18,789

5,276

28.08%

United Arab Emirates

48,824

11,500

23.55%

Finland

62,523

8,829

14.12%

Switzerland

87,200

11,234

12.88%

Croatia

48,155

6,153

12.78%

Lithuania

38,524

4,618

11.99%

Denmark

72,310

7,481

10.35%

Singapore

53,637

5,546

10.34%

Uruguay

54,638

5,315

9.73%

Slovak Republic

59,723

5,737

9.61%

New Zealand

60,940

5,248

8.61%

Ireland

59,296

5,016

8.46%

Belgium

123,469

9,690

7.85%

Bulgaria

70,188

5,282

7.53%

Norway

64,917

4,686

7.22%

Czech Republic

96,946

6,535

6.74%

Italy

605,490

38,142

6.30%

Albania

76,910

4,743

6.17%

Australia

291,967

17,774

6.09%

Spain

423,444

25,335

5.98%

Shanghai-China

108,056

6,374

5.90%

Serbia, Republic of

80,089

4,684

5.85%

Costa Rica

81,489

4,602

5.65%

Hong Kong-China

84,200

4,670

5.55%

Jordan

129,492

7,038

5.44%

Portugal

108,728

5,722

5.26%

Canada

417,873

21,548

5.16%

Israel

118,953

6,061

5.10%

Austria

93,537

4,756

5.08%

Sweden

102,087

4,739

4.64%

Greece

110,521

5,125

4.64%

Hungary

111,761

4,810

4.30%

Romania

146,243

5,074

3.47%

Tunisia

132,313

4,407

3.33%

Chile

274,803

6,857

2.50%

Netherlands

194,000

4,460

2.30%

Kazakhstan

258,716

5,808

2.24%

Chinese Taipei

328,356

6,046

1.84%

United Kingdom

738,066

12,659

1.72%

Mexico

2,114,745

33,806

1.60%

Poland

425,597

5,662

1.33%

Colombia

889,729

11,173

1.26%

Peru

584,294

6,035

1.03%

Malaysia

544,302

5,197

0.95%

Argentina

684,879

5,908

0.86%

Korea, Republic of

687,104

5,033

0.73%

France

792,983

5,682

0.72%

Thailand

982,080

6,606

0.67%

Germany

798,136

5,001

0.63%

Brazil

3,574,928

20,091

0.56%

Japan

1,241,786

6,351

0.51%

Russian Federation

1,272,632

6,418

0.50%

Turkey

1,266,638

4,848

0.38%

Vietnam

1,717,996

4,959

0.29%

United States

3,985,714

6,111

0.15%

Indonesia

4,174,217

5,622

0.13%

Totals

31,854,985

512,363

1.61

I noticed that every country with more than a million students in the age group tested a smaller than average percentage of their students. I’m not sure what percentage should be tested to ensure that the sample is representative of the country either. I just know this seems really, really small. While I don’t place much stock in PISA scores or the diatribes they generate, here’s some additional information in case you are interested (because it’s ok to be a skeptic, but better to be a well-informed skeptic):

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Leaning Trendline of PISA

December 3, 2013 1 comment

Pretend the image below is a Rorschach test and tell me what you take away from it:PISA

 

A)    That there is something called Math Literacy.

B)    That the US is behind too many other countries in Math Literacy.

C)    That the US has a lot more child poverty than most advanced countries.

D)    That the US beats the trend line for Math Literacy relative to poverty.

The great thing about an image such as this is that there is no wrong answer.

The Program for International Student Assessment released results such as these today, but without the socioeconomic overlay. While I typically don’t pay much attention to international tests, I think it’s critical that we pay attention to the X-axis. The US has way too many children in poverty. Among comparison countries, only Turkey, Chile, and Mexico have more. While all datasets have outliers, the fact remains that poverty impacts student achievement.

If you’re interested, by the way, US results are based on the test scores of just over 6,000 students. I wonder what the SDE’s new analyst thinks of that.

Categories: Uncategorized Tags: ,
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