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Third Grade Reading Scores – Pick a Headline

May 15, 2015

Today is the day that many third graders, their parents, and their schools have been anticipating. Schools now have online access to student scores on this year’s third grade reading (featuring language arts) test. The data portal seems to have worked for administrators retrieving results, and statewide, scores are up from last year.

For fun, let’s play a matching game. In the box below, on the left are three headlines. On the right are the sources of each. Try to guess which came from where.

Headline Source
Slight improvement seen in state third-grade reading test scores Oklahoma State Department of Education
More than 7,000 Oklahoma third-graders failed reading test, face retention Tulsa World
At least 85% of state’s third-graders pass to next grade under RSA The Oklahoman

This is the fun thing about data. All of these things are true. Let’s see how each source framed today’s results.

From the OSDE:

osde rsa

From the Tulsa World:

tulsa world rsa

From the Oklahoman:

jokelahoman rsa

How did you do? If you thought that the OSDE would have the most positive approach and that the Oklahoman the most negative, you’d have been right. Also, keep in mind that the writers don’t typically write their own headlines.

Here’s the rest of Superintendent Hofmeister’s press release:

At least 85 percent of Oklahoma third-graders pass to next grade under Reading Sufficiency Act

OKLAHOMA CITY (May 15, 2015) — Preliminary results from this school year’s third-grade Oklahoma Core Curriculum Test (OCCT) reading test indicate that at least 85 percent will be promoted to the next grade.

Out of more than 50,000 test-takers, 67 percent statewide scored “Proficient,” while 14.6 percent scored “Unsatisfactory.”

Preliminary results are as follows:

  • Unsatisfactory: 14.6 percent
  • Limited Knowledge: 15.9 percent
  • Proficient: 67 percent
  • Advanced: 2.5 percent

Under the Reading Sufficiency Act (RSA), third-grade students who score “Unsatisfactory” on the assessment and fail to meet an exemption are subject to retention for intensive remediation in reading. Students who score “Limited Knowledge” are not held back, but must receive reading remediation in fourth grade.

However, students have multiple opportunities to demonstrate mastery in the area of reading.

  • According to the RSA law, “any student who demonstrates proficiency on a screening instrument which meets the acquisition of reading skills criteria shall not be subject to the retention guidelines.”
  • Students can be evaluated with one of seven good-cause exemptions.
  • Probationary reading teams consisting of parents and teachers can meet to determine retention or promotion for students who scored “Unsatisfactory.”

State Superintendent of Public Instruction Joy Hofmeister said renewed focus on reading as a result of RSA has shown signs of improvement among Oklahoma’s third-graders.

“Literacy is critical for success in academics and throughout life, and the RSA plays a valuable role in ensuring that skill,” she said.

“While these numbers are preliminary and will change slightly, it appears the percentage of ‘Unsatisfactory’ has decreased. And more students evidently scored ‘Limited Knowledge,’ showing improvement between ‘Unsatisfactory’ and ‘Limited Knowledge.’

“But it is important to remember, too, that the current third-grade OCCT test given to satisfy federal test requirements was not designed to measure reading level the way it is being used for RSA. Instead, a valid reading test should include five essential elements: fluency, phonemic awareness, phonics, vocabulary and reading comprehension.

“For this reason it is very important that students who did not pass the OCCT reading test now be assessed by an RSA committee. These panels will examine other specific reading evidence to determine the need for retention or targeted intervention for next year. As these committees are essential to ensuring success, I urge the Legislature to keep their voices in the RSA process.”

The RSA committees are scheduled to dissolve at the end of the current school year unless lawmakers pass legislation to extend their existence. Additionally, lawmakers are considering a measure that would include “Limited Knowledge” students under the provisions of RSA. This year, for example, that would mean an additional 7,900 students evaluated for possible retention.

Over the next few weeks, school districts are required to contact parents and legal custodians of students who scored “Unsatisfactory” and determine the most effective course of action for these children.

Approximately two-thirds of students who scored “Unsatisfactory” are English Language Learners, on an Individualized Education Program (IEP), or both. That same designation also applies to roughly 39 percent of test-takers who scored “Limited Knowledge.”

Hofmeister’s words make me want to reiterate several important points that I’ve made at other times:

  • Scores have improved (slightly, as the World indicates) from last year.
  • This test is a poor measurement of reading ability.
  • The RSA promotion committees have worked well around the state.
  • Doubling the number of students in the promotion/retention committees dilutes the work needed for our most struggling students.
  • Without the RSA committees, we will be retaining special education students and those just learning to speak English at highly disproportionate levels.

This is why we all need to be aware of ongoing legislative discussions. Senate bill 630 is out of conference committee. The Legislature’s bill tracking site shows the most recent version with a date of April 22. Here are the key changes:

  • Keep the RSA Committees for promotion through the 2019-2020 school year (p. 4).
  • Add an RSA Committee for students not meeting benchmarks on screening instruments in first and second grade (p. 5).
  • Add students scoring Limited Knowledge into the retention discussion (p. 11).

The 2015 legislative session is almost over. Let your representative and senator know what you think about these changes.

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  1. Kate
    May 15, 2015 at 10:47 pm

    Isn’t it nice to have some factual information coming out of the Oklahoma State Department of Education? That’s something that I always took for granted….little did I know. Yes, the OCCT is NOT a reading test.

    And, by the way, we don’t need to hold 7,900 more committee meetings, just because some legislators want to preen.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. katherine
    May 26, 2015 at 11:54 pm

    I think we have poor humans to determine our kids future on a test. Some kids do better than others. Our kids are already stressed from school and sports and the government wants to pull this stupid test. Why don’t you start looking at how much they are a bully them self’s BC that’s why our kids are in depression, dropping out of school, and have no reason to study. We have such poor testing cause we are more worried about the test than what the kids are learning or help improve reading. When the dropping out gets higher. We can blame the government and our superintendent Joy Hofmeister’s. I voted for her and I so wrong in so many ways. None of the candidates were worth my vote. They don’t care about kids. They care about the money.

    Like

    • May 27, 2015 at 8:20 am

      I agree with what you’re saying except for blaming Joy. She fought to reduce testing and was undercut by the Legislature at every turn. Silence from the Governor didn’t help either.

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